Delaware Touts Sinatra Concert Next Month

Delaware Touts Sinatra Concert Next Month
By Wayne Witkowski
Pike County Dispatch - 7/16/20


DINGMANS FERRY -- It is anticipated to be the biggest music event for the Delaware Township
vicinity since the Boston Pops Symphony Orchestra, joined by rock music star Linda
Rondstadt, performed at nearby Mountain Laurel Performing Arts Center about 10 years ago.
Before that, Crosby Stills & Nash as well as the Allman Brothers graced the Tamiment amphitheater stage in Lehman Township.
This time, residents will see Jim Manfredonia give a free tribute concert performance of Frank
Sinatra on the evening of Aug. 22 at Akenac Park.
There are many highly regarded renditions of the "old blue eyes" swing music legend who died
in 1999 but Dennis Lee of the Dingmans Ferry Theater, who has led the way in putting the show
together, says Manfredonia's characterization is "legit."
Lee gave an update of the preparations for the show during last week's Delaware Township
Board of Supervisors meeting.
"It's the biggest thing in a long time here," said Lee of Manfredonia, who already has
established a big reputation of himself in the Philadelphia area. "People have been shut in from
the COVI(D-19) virus for so long and want to come and enjoy a night out."
A backdrop of film clips from the Sinatra era will enhance the show.
He said about eight volunteers from the theater company have put together a 20-foot by 20-foot stage that will have theatrical lighting.
Lee said he is auditioning local talent that will give complementary performances with Manfredonia.

"This will come together," said Lee afterward.

The concert idea began when Manfredonia reached out to Lee, a former schoolmate and

Manfredonia offered to perform a rendition of Sinatra songs for Lee and his neighbors.
To support Lee's efforts, the supervisors at last week's meeting approved an Akenac Park use
request by Lee and the Dingmans Ferry Theatre under the Delaware Township Recreation
Committee for performance rehearsals 5-9 p.m. Monday through Sunday effective immediately
and then from 5-11 p.m. for two weeks through Aug. 23 when the stage will be taken down.
Board of Supervisors Chairman John Henderson made it clear that this is not a private entity putting on a show in a municipal venue as some may question. "It's being done by the
(township) Rec Commission and the Dingmans Ferry Theater is sponsoring it," said Henderson.
"It's like what we do for Harvest Fest and for our Christmas at the park."
Also at the meeting, the board agreed to adopt the Coronavirus Workplace Policy, effective
immediately. Supervisor Jane Neufeld called it a "reasonable" policy.
The policy advises those exposed to known or suspected COVID-19 or possible COVID-19 to
undergo a diagnostic test. According to the policy, if results are negative, and symptoms are
determined to be not COVID-19 related, employees may return to work once symptoms
subside. "If results are positive, self-isolation is required and an employee shall only return to
work once the employee is cleared by a healthcare professional," it reads.
"Self-quarantine is recommended for employees who have been directly exposed to the virus or
who have traveled to areas where there are large numbers of people infected in order to
prevent further transmission for a period of 14 days."
The policy says that if exposed to COVID-19 or believed to be exposed to COVID-19, an
employee shall stay home, except to receive medical care, and work remotely.
It states that all employees working for Delaware Township are required to adhere to Center for
Disease Control (CDC), state, county and township orders, guidelines, policies and procedures
at all times. "Failure to adhere to all required orders, guidelines, policies and procedures may
lead to disciplinary action, including termination," the policy reads.
The supervisors asked how it has been determined where an employee has been if they have
traveled. "We don't ask that but we do ask where they are going," said township Administrator
Krista Predmore.
"Hopefully they'll be honest and protect everyone else," said Predmore.
Township Solicitor Tom Farley stressed that the township is following CDC policy. "We've been
working at it and it's been successful so far," he said.
In other coronavirus matters, the board voted, 2-1, against a proposal for 13 no-touch sink
faucets for all township bathroom facilities by a contractor for $14,734.48. "It's an awful lot of
money," said Henderson. "You can't live in a bubble," said resident Steve McBride, who
wondered about no-touch paper towels and toilet paper dispensers and door handles coming
next. Neufeld cast the lone "yes" vote.
The board also agreed to re-advertise for the Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator, an
effort first done earlier in the year before the coronavirus sidetracked that idea and some other
municipal issues.
Three road bid projects were awarded to low bidder Wayco for Spencer Road ($29,044.20),
Weber Road ($27,750.92) and Ball Park Road ($46,150.00). Henderson asked about that
contractor's work on previous township road projects and heard some critical remarks from
roadmaster Vince Flatt and resident McBride. "We'll have to keep an eye on that," said
Henderson.
After favoring a singular bid to replace the township garage roof, the supervisors reversed gear
and agreed to turn the project over to township Engineer Jon Tresslar to see whether the roof
can be replaced or coated.
The board agreed to hold and advertise a joint public hearing with the Delaware Township Board
of Supervisors and the Delaware Township Planning Commission 7:15 p.m. on July 22
regarding the Black Bear subdivision.
The 600 acres were split, with the current owner retaining half the property and selling the other
half to a new owner. Farley pointed out most of the property lies in Dingman Township but about
30 acres are in Delaware Township. The Pike Planning Commission already approved the move
but wants both townships to be in agreement.
Farley said the property at this point appears to be dedicated to recreation purposes such as
hiking. bicycling and riding land vehicles.
Supervisors agreed to distribute second quarter Fire Taxes of $117,394.11 to the Delaware
Township Volunteer Fire Company.
They agreed to renew the annual agreement with Portland Contractors Inc. for certified water
operations of township facilities.
Supervisors approved a field use request by Matthew Oehlmann Memorial Softball League for
fields 1 and 3 on Sundays, July 19 through Sept. 27,9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The board agreed to host and advertise Delaware Township Library free books days on July 21
and 23 from 3-6 p.m and July 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The library is closing down and turning
over its space in the Akenac Park building to co-tenant Dingmans Ferry-Delaware Township
Historical Society, which has pointed out its need for more room for its expanding displays.
Supervisors approved a municipal hall use request by the U.S. Census Bureau for orientation of
Census Enumerators on Thursday, July 30 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Census response has been
slow in Pike County.

The board, during its workshop prior to the regular meeting, was surprised to receive a
proposed Keeping of Animal Ordinance from the township Planning Commission but, after
lengthy discussion, refused to put it to a vote. The ordinance concerns homeowners who have
roosters, chickens and horses on their property. It addresses complaints from some neighbors
about noise from those animals.
Henderson seemed surprised this came back from the Planning Commission because he said
the supervisors had looked at it previously. "I don't recall asking the Planning Commission to
come up with this," said Henderson. "We are in a rural area and I've lived here 22 years and
what I see is people want less regulations, not more. I never heard one complaint about (those)
animals." Neufeld said she heard complaints about noise from chickens and roosters but
expressed doubt for the need for an ordinance. "I really think this is overkill," said Henderson.